Category Archives: Politics

How do I purge this hate?



Hey! People are listening to this show! It’s only hundreds among the possible billions, but that’s still a lot. More than I expected this soon. Thanks to all of you! And thanks to Jeff Salzman of the DailyEvolver.com for helping me keep a steady flow of quality content each week while WYT gets off the ground. Thank you, sir!

And not only are people listening, but some are engaging too. Last week a comment appeared under the “Bright side of the Trump Apocalypse” episode that had a lot to say and also asked a very interesting question. I pointed it out to Jeff and we agreed that it would make a good topic for the next Integral Chat. And having just listened to the show before posting, I think it did. This is a good talk. So thank you to William for your comment and your question.

You can see his full comment here. It is detailed and insightful throughout, but here is the section we will be focusing on in particular.

“I truly wish I could develop the level of unattachment that Jeff displays towards the Traditional Mind Set. As a 65 year old gay man, I have to admit I have tremendous rage towards these people. They actively seek to scapegoat gay people. They actively lobby to have gay rights and gay marriage overthrown. They actively promote GOP religious fanatics who seek to do as much harm to me and my husband of 40 years as possible. How do I purge this hate?”

That’s an excellent question. If there is a specific answer, I imagine it would differ from person to person, but often the learning is in the contemplating itself. And that’s what we’ll try to offer, contemplation through conversation. I think I learned something from contemplating this question today. So thanks again, William.

As always, the Altitudes of Development Chart will help to follow along with the conversation.

But beyond the chart, I also want to provide a little underlying context about what Integral Theory means to me specifically. In other words, “Why the Integral Chat?”

Here is a paraphrasing of what’s discussed early in this episode:

Quoting Joseph Campbell from “The Power of Myth:” “My friend Heinrich Zimmer of years ago used to say, “The best things can’t be told,” because they transcend thought. “The second best are misunderstood,” because those are the thoughts that are supposed to refer to that which can’t be thought about, and one gets stuck in the thoughts.”The third best are what we talk about.”

As one of the many people of the current generations on who seek some kind of bridge between the logic and measurability of science and mind-expansion and soul nourishment that comes with spiritual pursuits, Integral Theory offers a set of tools, really a terminology which we can use as common reference points when we talk about the ineffable, higher things. Science and rationality don’t do well with the higher things because they lack the tools to measure them. Thus all spiritual information is reduced to anecdotal information, and is therefore viewed but he scientific and rational mind as largely meaningless. Or at least more meaningless that it all seems to experiencer who is struggling to convey his anecdote of spiritual consciousness in a useful way.

If you were trying to explain to me what it’s really like to be in love with a the specific person you are in love with, you would need to step into Campbell’s “second best” things to get me close to seeing what your feeling. You may have to right a beautiful song or poem if you really want to make an impression. The tools and terms provided by Integral Theory (again, the chart is pretty potent), make it easier to have conversations that begin from higher ground, and that makes it easier to really get some where.  So.. thats why the Integral Chat.

As aways, I try for the disembodied voices in the pre-amble to set the stage for the theme of the episode. Today it’s Alan Watts from “The Myth of Myself.”

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Is Climate Change an evolutionary tool?



Why do Traditional, Modern, and Post-Modern mindsets see climate change differently? Why doesn’t science settle the issue? And what’s it going to cost us if we can’t get on the same page?

Jeff Salzman of the Daily Evolver podcast stops in for another in an ongoing series of conversations we’re calling the Integral Chat. Jeff and Steve look at our world’s rapidly evolving circumstances through the lens of Integral Theory.

This week: Is Climate Change an evolutionary tool? Is it going to change us fast enough to deal with it? Is it getting hot in here or not? How can it be that three different types of people can disagree on the weather?

The voices in  the pre-amble this time are Terence Mckenna, Charlton Heston and, in one of the most “integral” speeches ever, Rick Grimes.

Once again, here is the helpful chart that makes Integral Theory easy to follow:

 

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The Bright Side of the Trump Apocalypse



President Donald J. Trump. Those words bring out a lot of emotions all the way across our political and emotional spectrums. Some liberals view them as Apocalyptic. Some conservatives think they are going to Make America Great Again.

But what if they are both right? What if the Apocalypse can be a good thing?

Most people associate the word Apocalypse with a myth about the total destruction or end of the world. That is what the word has come to mean, but as with many words, like “liberal” or “conservative” or “myth” to just name a few, the word “apocalypse” used to mean something else. And that original meaning is something worth looking at.

There is, of course, a great deal of symbolism implied by the word. In the Bible, the book most often associated with it, the Apocalypse can also be viewed as the total destruction not of the world, but of the ruling paradigm. In other words, Jesus came to change the world, in a sense destroying the old way of being in favor a new one. Hammurabi’s code of “an eye for eye,” for example, became “love thy neighbor as you love yourself.” And, symbolically, a new world was born with the destruction of one paradigm in favor of a new, more evolved world view. In another myth making the same point, the Phoenix rises from the ashes.

However, the origin of the word Apocalypse gives still another meaning.

ORIGIN
Old English, via Old French and ecclesiastical Latin from Greek apokalupsis, from apokaluptein ‘uncover, reveal,’ from apo- ‘un-’ + kaluptein ‘to cover.’

And the election of Donald Trump, no matter where you sit on the political spectrum, has uncovered and revealed a lot of things. Revelations open the door to new possibilities. Could it be that the Trump Apocalypse is opening the door for one or more new paradigms to take the place of old worn out patterns and practices that are no longer helpful?

NEW WEEKLY FEATURE: The Integral Chat

WYT is a new Podcast. And while we gear up to bring you many guests and fascinating theories in the future, this week kicks off a new regular feature we’re very excited about: Jeff Salzman of the Daily Evolver will be joining Stephen T. Harper for a series of conversations about a variety of topics, viewed from Jeff’s unique perspective and the lens of Integral Theory.

This week we take a look at the bright side of some of the many disturbing things happening in American culture.

Because there is always a bright side. Well… usually.

Who’s talking in the Pre-amble this week? Terence Mckenna, Donald Trump, Terence Mckenna, Donald Trump, Prince Ea

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